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Our Mission: To promote a thriving film and video production community in West Michigan. Starmap

The Alliance: an e-publication of the West Michigan Film & Video Alliance - semi-monthly edition

August 29, 2010

The WMFVA strives to provide comprehensive information on the Michigan film industry. This newsletter is our bi-weekly communication with our members and other West Michigan film professionals.

  • MFO's Ken Droz steps down after 2 years

    Lansing -- Ken Droz, communications consultant for the Michigan Film Office, who has been the public face of Michigans explosive film production since the incentives were passed in 2008, will leave the position the end of August.

    [read more]

    His replacement, Michelle Begnoche, comes from the state house, where she served as press secretary to State Representative Bart Stupak (D-Menominee).

    Since being hired in 2008, Droz, who has a strong background in marketing for major Los Angeles film studios and entertainment outlets, has responded to hundreds of press queries from media outlets worldwide that track the state's success while filmmakers take advantage of whats been called the best incentive program in the nation.

    Droz leaves with a firm belief in the people who drive the business. "We are in the beginning stages of what is really a wonderful thing for the state. It's been like a giant cloud of possibility over the whole state that people really needed," he says.

    "It's been an explosion, basically," he says of the states recent growth. "To have $300 million in productions this year is a great testament to the program."

    Droz managed Michigan marketing activities for several major film studios for more than a dozen years before moving to Los Angeles in 2000 to operate his own public relations firm.

    His clients included the Writers Guild Foundation, Paramount Pictures, Revolution Studios, Farmers Almanac TV and Creative Screenwriting Magazine.

    The Michigan Film Office is located at 300 N. Washington Square 4th Floor, Lansing; phone 800/477-3456 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              800/477-3456      end_of_the_skype_highlighting. See www.michiganfilmoffice.org

  • Ani-Motion: Canon HDSLR Reality Check

    by Mathew Schirado

    Lets face it, the Canon 5D Mark II is the most exciting video camera on the market for independent professionals. Its full frame CMOS image sensor is the equivalent of VistaVision film, used for VFX photography for every Steven Speilberg movie in the 80s. Its razor-small depth-of-field is the Holy Grail for cinematographer purists. Its ability to shoot under low-light conditions keeps pace with 35mm film. Its frankly possible to intercut 5D and film shots without the viewer noticing the difference. However, while its possible to shoot an indie feature with an HDSLR, it might not be preferable.

    [read more]

    Canons 5D is comparatively cheap ($2500 camera body) compared to, well...everything out there with competing sensors: a RED One ($18,000), Arri Alexa ($70,000), a 2/3rds inch sensor Sony PMW-350 XDCam EX ($17,500). Accessories will still cost a fraction of a typical film camera, but its easy to quadruple the price with a couple lenses, tripod, shoulder rig, rail system, audio preamps, etc. Professional videographers could spend up to $15,000 when all is said and done.

    Average Canon lenses could cost $100-$2000 versus $2000-$25,000 for high-end video or cinema-grade lenses. Many cinematographers will prefer to use the lenses theyve used in the past, but due to the 5Ds design, a number of Hollywood PL-mount cinema lenses wont fit. One companys work-around is to boar out the lens opening (invalidating your warranty) for re-threading pro cinema lenses. Thankfully, more high-end lens manufacturers are building lens sets designed for the 5D, including Schenider Optics and Zeiss. Make sure to use lenses designed for full-frame sensors as well. Made for still cameras, Canons more affordable zoom lenses were never designed for adjustment while you take a shot. Some Canons zoom in a push-pull fashion, while others use a rotating ring. With either, gentle or variable zoom movements are challenging, and maybe impossible. Many users simply avoid zooming altogether.

    Focusing is more important thanks to narrow DOF, and once you start recording, you only have the 3-inch LCD viewer to reference. Most pros will budget $400 for a snap-on viewfinder to magnify the screen, or use a heavy duty rig holding a separate 7-inch LCD monitor fed through a mini-HDMI jack. Precise rack-focusing requires a $500-$1500 follow-focus rig. A second follow-focus rig could be used to adjust zoom rings smoothly, but Id like to see anyone affix two rigs at the same time.

    The 5Ds internal microphone is horrible, as it often picks up the lens motor noise. Unless you record double system audio with a Zoom handheld flash audio recorder (or equivalent) prepare to buy an XLR audio adapter and mixer which jack into the Canons 1/8th inch input. You can also get a Rode on-camera mini-shotgun mic that attaches to the accessory slot on top of the 5D.

    The biggest compromise to image quality is heavy H.264 video compression in 8-bit colorspace, along with line-skipping to reduce a 21 megapixel image to a 1920x1080 HiDef format. Jim Jannard of RED recently slammed Canon for line-skipping and the dancing-line artifacting that can occur with repeating patterns and high-detail imagery. CMOS sensors suffer from rolling shutter, which skews vertical lines when panning quickly. This makes 3D tracking software impossible to use. The Foundrys Rolling Shutter plug-in is designed to fix shots so they are usable, but this will bring out compression artifacts more notably. All this implies a specific post-production workflow and processing that requires a lot of time and hard disk space. Further, dont expect to key any green-screen easily. Quick turnarounds simply wont work.

    Canon limits recording times to about 12 minutes (longer times levy a higher tax in Europe), so long recordings cant be done. Any heavy recording or operation in hot conditions could overheat the camera, forcing it to shut down. This does not happen for everyone but its good to be aware.

    The 5Ds rise has sparked a flurry of imagination at what will come next. Maybe the Mark III will be announced soon, or another firmware update will unlock new features. Manufacturers will ultimately release lenses with finer zoom controls, and the dream of a RAW movie mode will eventually land in our laps. However, if youre buying a camera now, be realistic with how youll use it, with the features it has now. Despite missing functionality for videographers, I wouldnt be surprised if my next camera becomes a 5D Mark II...once I have hands-on experience to see if it will really fit my particular shooting needs.

  • Eduardo Sanchez and Tom Sullivan to appear at Mid Michigan film festival

    Eduardo Sanchez, considered a pioneer in the independent film world after directing the most successful indie film of all time, The Blair Witch Project, will make a rare appearance at the St. Valentine's Day Massacre, a horror film festival at the Ionia Theater in Ionia, Michigan on Feb. 5, 2011.

    Tom Sullivan, the special effects coordinator for the 1981 classic horror film, The Evil Dead, will join Sanchez at the festival and both plan to hold discussions and meet-and-greet sessions.

    [read more]

    Tom, a Michigan native, also worked on other cult classic films including Army of Darkness and The Fly II.

    "Tom is well known in the horror community for creating some ground breaking special effects," said event coordinator Mark Hodges. "Tom is also great at speaking about his craft and will be interesting for the film makers and fans in attendance." 

    Sanchez is most known for being the writer and director of the successful, The Blair Witch Project, a 1999 film noted for holding the Guinness world record for "Top Budget: Box Office Ratio" (for a mainstream feature film). The film cost $22,000 to make and made back $240.5 milliona ratio of $1 spent for every $10,931 made.

    The film was also revolutionary in its viral marketing campaigns and Eduardo organized the Internet advertising for the film.

    "Getting Eduardo to come out to one of our events is very exciting," said Hodges. "Eduardo will have a lot to teach independent film makers in terms of marketing their films, plus it is great for the more casual film fans to meet a man who created one of the great independent films of all time."

    Sanchez  will be discussing The Blair Witch Project after a screening of the film and Sullivan will host a special effects seminar on how to make blood and gore effects out of simple household products, as well as sign autographs.

    Tom will also bring along his "Evil Dead Museum" of various props used in the film as well as his artwork and other oddities.

  • Industry Articles

    Detroit author, radio host, and screenwriter Mitch Albom takes on critics of Michigan's Film Incentives. Link to podcasts of his show below:

    http://wjrpodcasts.com/podcasts/mitchalbom/MA-BigAl-092810.mp3
    http://wjrpodcasts.com/podcasts/mitchalbom/MA-CarrieJones-092210.mp3


    Milford native Dax Shepard on 'Parenthood'

    By B.J. Hammerstein, Detroit Free Press

    -Things are going well for 35-year-old Dax Shepard, the Milford native who began his Hollywood ascent in 2003 on Ashton Kutcher's MTV hidden-camera TV series "Punk'd." The actor-writer-director appears weekly on the small screen on NBC's family-centric dramedy "Parenthood" as the fun-loving Crosby Braverman, a young man thrust into adulthood by way of a long-distance relationship and (surprise!) a 5-year-old son. Read full article.

    Detroit Free Press Rochelle Riley column

    Any critic of Michigan's film industry incentives should call Mike Smith, director of the Walter Reuther Library at Wayne State University.
    No one knows more about labor history or better understands Michigan industry. Read full article.

    [read more]

    Reel Michigan on Reel Chicago Michigan's biggest stage rental revived by sale

    Also: New productions in Detroit and West Michigan The sale of Hangar42, the defunct Grand Rapids studio project that went down in flames this summer when the developer was charged with attempted fraud, is being revived as Michigans biggest stage rental. L.A.-based developers SHM Partners will purchase the 300,000-sq.ft. southern portion of the former Lear factory from Kent County for $7.3 million. It will be leased to 50-50 Entertainment, a Texas-based music company. Read full article.

    Snyder makes his case in largely Democratic Detroit

    BY KATHLEEN GRAY FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

    Susan Hooks-Brown usually votes for Democrats, but on a dreary Tuesday, she came out to hear a Republican speak about the upcoming election. And she's keeping an open mind about Rick Snyder, the GOP candidate for governor. "We in Michigan keep doing it the same way, and expect a different outcome, and that's insanity," said the 53-year-old Detroiter. "But it's broke, and many of these issues should not be partisan." Read full article.

    Groupon Used to Premiere Indie Documentary Film

    An independent documentary film called Ready, Set, Bag! has made innovative use of social media to promote itself in the challenging local theater market, and its strategy culminates with a Groupon that could change the way small films are distributed. Read full article.

    A Star Is Born | Suzanne Chessler | Special to the Jewish News

    Farmington Hills native James Wolk stars in a dramatic new TV series and in a movie comedy, both debuting this month. On a break from acting out romantic interludes and comedic conflict for the feature film You Again, two emerging screen stars shared some Vernors ginger ale in honor of the area where their artistic interests took hold. Read full article.

    Michigan film tax credit has intangible benefits

    by Jack Lessenberry

    Michigan Sen. Nancy Cassis, a former teacher in her final term, has waged a long and sometimes lonely crusade against the state's film tax credit.

    Yes, it's nice to see big-deal movie stars on the street, she says, but state government shouldn't be in the business of trying to "pick winners and losers." Aside from her philosophical opposition, she wasn't convinced it would work. Read full article.

    States debate rebate fate Cash-strapped locales step up scrutiny of tax incentives

    By ANTHONY KAUFMAN
    With state economies in turmoil, local tax incentives for film and TV production are becoming the latest political football in the battle to bolster local fortunes. In Michigan, which has the most aggressive rebate in the country (up to 42%), debate is heating up after a report issued last week cast doubts about the economic benefits of the state's program. Read full article

    Scout & About: Made in Michigan

    Incentives have turned state into top production hub

    At a time when Michigan's hard-hit industrial economy continues to sputter, the klieg lights are on for the state's new growth engine: entertainment. But while filming in the state has experienced an unprecedented boom, some wonder how long that growth can be sustained. Read full article

    Lieutenant governor hopeful Brenda Lawrence says the difference is clear between Bernero and Snyder

    Democratic lieutenant governor nominee Brenda Lawrence told a small crowd of University of Michigan students today that she and Virg Bernero may be down in the polls, but expect to close the gap in the coming weeks by getting their message out to voters. http://www.annarbor.com/news/lieutenant-governor-hopeful-brenda-lawrence-says-the-difference-is-clear-between-bernero-and-snyder/

    Coming-of-age romantic comedy 'Flipped' hits the right bittersweet notes

    BY ROGER MOORE ORLANDO SENTINEL 10 Sept 2010

    She's mad about the boy. But boys being boys, he doesn't share her enthusiasm. She's a tween stalker, if they'd used that word for needy, pushy, too-interested suitors back in the early '60s.

    http://www.freep.com/article/20100910/ENT01/9100325/1322/Coming-of-age-romantic-comedy-Flipped-hits-the-right-bittersweet-notes#ixzz0z968sUyY

    Snyder not a fan of film tax credits
    By Ed Brayton 9/7/10 7:16 AM

    Republican candidate for governor Rick Snyder is not a big fan of the generous tax credits up to 42 percent of the total costs used to attract Hollywood production companies to make movies in the state of Michigan. The Detroit Free Press reports:

    When asked whether Snyder supports or opposes the tax breaks, his spokesman, Bill Nowling said: He thinks the program in the long term is not financially sustainable. Having said that, he recognizes there are businesses in the state that have made investments based on those (tax) credits. http://michiganmessenger.com/41634/snyder-not-a-fan-of-film-tax-credits

    Film Industry Takes Root in Detroit Metro:Detroit. Were Cheap and Easy.

    So goes the slogan of Film Detroit, a division of the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau and a connection point between metro Detroit and Hollywood, which has already infused more than $260 million in gross production into the region. http://americancity.org/buzz/entry/2580/

    Citys time to shine: Excitement over Detroit 1-8-7 brings out stars, local celebs
    By B.J. HAMMERSTEIN

    FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER 8 Sept 2010

    The Motor City landed in the Hollywood spotlight Tuesday night as stars of the new TV series Detroit 1-8-7 came out for a red-carpet premiere.

    The private affair at the MGM Grand Detroit started about 7 p.m. City officials and business leaders were there, along with stars from the series, including Michael Imperioli, Natalie Martinez, James Mc-Daniel and Jon Michael Hill, and executive producers David Zabel, Jason Richman and Kevin Hooks. About 300 people showed up for a screening of the pilot episode of the ABC cop drama, the first network prime-time series to be shot fully in Detroit. http://detroitfreepress.mi.newsmemory.com/?token=5d736c42b5ebf111ec8e46cfb39ed0f4&cnum=2627077&fod=1111111ARC

    Northern Michigan's Movie Moguls
    By Ross Boissoneau

    It used to be that if you Googled the phrase film industry in northern Michigan youd get back no more than a handful of responses. And most of those would bring up Rich Brauers name.

    Times have changed. While Brauer remains the constant, several other filmmakers now call the area home, with more promised on the horizon. The Traverse City Film

    Festival and the states Film Incentive program have helped spearhead the change. http://www.tcbusinessnews.com/news/northern-michigan-acirc-s-movie-moguls

    Grace & Wild Studios Provides Elite Entertainment Services to Feature Film Productions

    Farmington Hills, MI, August 27, 2010 | SHOOT Publicity Wire | --- Feature films and various entertainment projects continue to pour into the State of Michigan in 2010, and Hollywood production companies are utilizing the sound stages, film processing lab, and post-production services at Grace & Wild Studios. http://poetiqroses.livejournal.com/179346.html

    Welcome, Hollywood
    Friday, September 10, 2010 8:58 AM EDT

    When the City of Bad Axe announced the crew and cast of This Must Be the Place was going to film in Huron County, the overwhelming response was excitement. Some people, however, were concerned about the traffic problems the filming would cause and about Hollywood-types gallivanting about our pastoral county. http://www.michigansthumb.com/articles/2010/09/10/news/editorial/doc4c8a23b2ef260636948417.txt

    Conviction director credits Michigan's credits
    by James Sanford

    TORONTO On a soap opera, the announcement might go something like this: "The role of Massachusetts is now being played by ... Michigan." Thats exactly whats happening in "Conviction," opening Oct. 15. Director Tony Goldwyn brought his crew to eastern Michigan nearly two years ago to film what was then titled "Betty Ann Waters," a drama based on the true story of determined single mom and bartender Betty Ann Waters (Hilary Swank), who put herself through law school after her loosecannon brother, Kenny (Sam Rockwell), was convicted of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment. http://www.lansingcitypulse.com/lansing/article-4795-the-screening-room.html

    Michigan's economic recovery hinges on turnaround strategies debated by Rick Snyder, Virg Bernero

    Nathan Bomey | AnnArbor.com

    As Michigans gubernatorial candidates  vie for the chance to lead the states economic revitalization efforts, regional economic developers are hoping to influence the states strategy after the Nov. 2 election.

    Michigans economic development strategy is becoming a central issue in the race between Ann Arbor venture capitalist and Republican candidate Rick Snyder and Lansing Mayor and Democratic candidate Virg Bernero. http://www.annarbor.com/business-review/rick-snyder-virg-bernero-michigan-economic-development-corp-medc-tax-incentives-governor-election/

    Toronto Festival debut for TicTocks first feature Whats Wrong with Virginia premieres Sept. 15

    By PETER DAINING

    The Holland Sentinel Posted Aug 17, 2010 @ 02:41 PM

    Less than a year after filming began in Holland, Whats Wrong with Virginia is set to premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

    The movie stars Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Emma Roberts and Amy Madigan. It was directed by Academy Award-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black, and produced by TicTock Studios of Saugatuck. Read Full Article.

    Something to see: Display Group makes a go of being all show

    By Trudy Gallant-Stokes Special to Crain's Detroit Business

    Rick Portwood loves going to work each day because he never knows what event design challenge he is going to face.

    With one of the largest inventories in the Midwest of cool props items ranging from a replica of Michelangelo's David to a huge mahogany bar Portwood, president of Display Group, and his staff of 16 full-time and 10 part-time set and graphic designers, are up to the challenge. Housed in a 200,000-square-foot warehouse west of downtown Detroit on Fort Street, Display Group is an event planner's dream come true. Read full article.

    Is Hollywood settling into a prolonged recession of its own?

    The expendables No one needs any introduction to America's prolonged recession, which has put millions of people out of work and set the country on edge, creating an unprecedented level of angst, anger and political unrest. But even though this year's box office grosses are up a little over a year ago -- due mainly to higher ticket prices and 3-D -- Hollywood remains in the grip of a serious recession of its own. Read Full Article

    Jobs don't star in Michigan's film industry tax credits

    BY MICHAEL D. LaFAIVE

    Like the "great and wonderful Oz" of the silver screen, Michigan's film subsidy program continues to dazzle. When Toto pulls back the curtain, however, the reality disappoints. This particular "jobs program" is all flash and no net job creation.

    Sticking taxpayers with up to 42% of the expenses incurred by film productions here, the program also underscores Michigan government's schizophrenic tax policy that keeps overall taxes too high to attract job providers, but cuts taxes or writes subsidy checks for a handful of politically favored firms or industries. Read Full Article.

    Places to Shoot a Movie in Michigan

    by Eleventh Earl of Mar

    When someone says Michigan, what comes to mind-besides cars, snow and college football? How about regional filmmaking capital?

    That idea may be new to some movie fans and movie makers, but it shouldnt be. After all, the Wolverine State has long attracted filmmakers as a shooting location, thanks to its excellent cities, historically strong economy, and-above all-its great geographical diversity. The states great strength, for movie directors, is that it offers many kinds of backdrop, and can stand in for nearly any location in the country. Read Full Article.

    Northern Michigan's Movie Moguls

    By Ross Boissoneau

    It used to be that if you Googled the phrase film industry in northern Michigan youd get back no more than a handful of responses. And most of those would bring up Rich Brauers name.

    Times have changed. While Brauer remains the constant, several other filmmakers now call the area home, with more promised on the horizon. The Traverse City Film Festival and the states Film Incentive program have helped spearhead the change. Read Full Article.

    Grace & Wild Studios Provides Elite Entertainment Services to Feature Film Productions

    Farmington Hills, MI, August 27, 2010 | SHOOT Publicity Wire | --- Feature films and various entertainment projects continue to pour into the State of Michigan in 2010, and Hollywood production companies are utilizing the sound stages, film processing lab, and post-production services at Grace & Wild Studios. Read Full Article.

    West Michigan Film Industry Task Force launched first event

    The West Michigan Film Industry Task Force brought Carrie Jones, new director of the Michigan Film Office, to Grand Rapids today to meet with the media and invited members of the community who are influential to filmmaking efforts. Read more.

    ArtPeers: Pleased To Meet You!

    by ArtPeers (ArtPeers) on Thursday Aug 12th, 2010 in NON-PROFIT

    My name is Erin Wilson, ArtPeers co-founder and President. I'd like to explain what we are, how we came to be and where we're going. Starting with the artsy use of unnecessary punctuation and lower-case words which - I've learned - is like Shake 'N Bake for cool: this.is.art.peers read all about it.

    Could the President find you on STARMAP? Dawn Butlers success story. Read more.

    Big Screen Entertainment Group to File Disclosure Statements

    August 11th, 2010 SOURCE: Big Screen Entertainment Group

    HOLLYWOOD, CA(Marketwire August 11, 2010) Big Screen Entertainment Group (PINKSHEETS: BSEG) will soon file both their completed 15c-211 Disclosure Statements and their three year consolidated financial statements. Read more.

    Reel opportunity: MSU, students taking larger, proactive role in Michigans growing film industry

    By Anthony Odoardi (Last updated: 07/18/10 10:57pm)

    The push for Michigans film students to stay in the state and lead the growth of its film industry has started with the development of the 2010 Creative Film Alliance Summer Film Institute. Read full article.

    Gaming, animation company benefits from tax incentive

    By Jeremy Carroll C & G Staff Writer

    ROYAL OAK The Michigan film tax incentive is back at work in Royal Oak, but Clint Eastwood and Sigourney Weaver are nowhere to be found. Instead, the star here is Sean Hurwitz and his team of designers and animators at PixoFactor Entertainment. Read full article 

    What do Michigan's gubernatorial candidates say about tax incentives?

    Published: Monday, July 19, 2010, 9:51 AM

    The Grand Rapids Press The Grand Rapids Press

    MICHIGAN MUST CONTINUE to offer certain strategic tax incentives ... Otherwise, we will simply lose new business opportunities ... Eliminating incentives is a form of unilateral disarmament that would relegate Michigan to the bottom of the heap among all states. Read full article

    MICHIGAN in the top ten of Movie Locations

    Eligible film productions with a minimum in-state spend of $50,000 can earn a 40-percent refundable tax credit across the board on Michigan expenditures. Productions also can take advantage of an extra two-percent tax credit if filming in one of Michigans 136 core communities. According to Michigan Film Office (MFO) Communication Consultant Ken Droz, Michigan generated $224 million in 2009 and will soon announce the completion of two large projects that have been in the works for some time. There is a heightened level of excitement, Droz says. Read full article

    Setting the Stage(s) for Production Coast to Coast

    By Mark R. Smith MARKEE Magazine

    It's been a challenging economy for just about everyone in every industry, including the companies that set the stage(s) for the country's movie and TV output. But major stage complexes nationwide are staying profitable by catering to new markets, investing in infrastructure and offering new capabilities while promoting those oh-so-crucial tax incentives that progressive states offer. That translates to more prospects, more work, more expansion and more content on a screen near you. Read full article

    'Win by Fall' actor Big Spence bringing film to Grand Rapids

    Just call him Big Spence.

    That's the name on the Screen Actor's Guild card of the up-and-coming Los Angeles actor, one of the stars of "Win by Fall," which filmed in Rockford and wrapped on Wednesday. Read full article.

    Bills would shed more light on movie money

    Two bills approved by a state House committee Wednesday would increase the transparency of Michigan's filmmaking tax incentives to the public, media representatives and tax analysts said. Read full article.

    Film producer's new project lofty goal: Help film a movie a month in West Michigan

    Los Angeles film producer Randall Emmett had no clue where Grand Rapids was a year ago, but he hopes his new production services company puts the city on the industry's map. Read full article.

    Supernatural thriller 'Playback' to shoot in Grand Rapids

    A New York film production company announced today it will shoot a supernatural thriller in Grand Rapids beginning in August. Read full article.

    Fred Ward joining '30 Minutes or Less': Actor cast as Danny McBride's dad in action comedy

    By Jay A. Fernande

    Ben Stiller, Stuart Cornfeld and Jeremy Kramer are producing through their Red Hour Films. The pic is scheduled to begin filming late next month in Grand Rapids, Mich. Read full article.

    Movie to be filmed in Rockford

    Valerie Clarke

    A windfall of opportunity is coming to town called "Win by Fall." It is a feature film about wrestling set to shoot at Rockford High School on July 6-9. The film stars three time UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) heavyweight champion Dan "The Beast" Severn. Read full article.

    MFP: Considering that "Things Fall Apart" wrapped several weeks ago, I got to wonder what's up here.

    By Katey Rich: 2010-05-24 18:11:28

    Ray Liotta Is The Doctor Treating Football Player 50 Cent It's still not particularly clear how the small-scale drama Things Falls Apart is going to pull off the feat of making Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson look like a believable college football player, given that the man is 35 years old and his acting skills are, well, a little fuzzy. Read Full Article.

    In the movies: Grand Rapids film company aims to elevate West Michigan

    MLive.com

    There is a very concerted effort from the Michigan Film Office to see above-the-line producers, writers and directors cultivate an atmosphere in the state ... 

    June 21st Filming Locations . . . Including "Harold and Kumar"

    BeforeTheTrailer.com, 06/21/10  

    Domestic Diva Katie Brown Unveils Her Exclusive Line of Home Goods in Her Hometown of Petoskey

    MyNorth.com, 06/21/10

    Podcast: Is Detroit Becoming Hollywood Lite?

    Detroit.Blogs.Time.com, 06/18/10

    CNN's Tom Foreman reports on how New Mexico is beating the recession by taking a cue from Hollywood

    Watch video added on May 18, 2010


    State Fair Studios Full Service Film Production & Post Production Studio Complex

    S3 Entertainment Group has put forth a proposal to the State of Michigan to develop the Michigan State Fairgrounds into a full service film production and post production studio complex. In addition, the proposal includes the operation of the Michigan State Fair beginning in 2010 with substantial expansion of the Michigan State Fair in subsequent years. Read Full Article.

    MSU, WSU, U of M a Collaborative Filmmaking Project

    Posted By: JamesSanford

    It's the kind of summer camp a lot of aspiring filmmakers would dream of attending, a place where you can network with students from other schools, combine your talents and create a movie in the space of a few weeks. That fantasy is about to become reality for a group of students from Michigan State University, Wayne State University and the University of Michigan this summer. Read Full Article.

    Rave reviews for new film class at Muskegon Community College

    By Eric Gaertner | Muskegon Chronicle
    May 10, 2010
    If the students and Muskegon Community College administration were the critics, the college's inaugural Introduction to Film Production course would receive "two thumbs up," and a script would be written for its sequel. Read Full Article.

    He's not Jewish; He's Coming Home

    Interview with Paul Schrader
    By Jen Pider
    Though Paul Schrader isn't Jewish, he is a Grand Rapids native, graduate of Calvin College and accomplished film-maker. Read full article.

    The Detroit Blog:  One year. One city. Endless opportunities.
    The State of Our City:  Unfiltered: Megan Grano on Michigan v. Hollywood

    Posted by Karen Dybis Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 10:37 am  Read blog post

    Gov. Granholm says film incentives are creating jobs today and for the future 

    By Jackie Headapohl

    In her weekly radio address, Gov. Jennifer Granholm celebrates the two-year anniversary of the Michigan film incentive program and the jobs it has brought to the state. In her weekly radio address, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm today said that Michigans film incentive program is creating jobs today and for the futureread full article.

    Michigan on Film: An Endlessly Useful Location 

    March 30th, 2010 | Author: Robyn Mueller

    One upper-Midwestern state has gone to great lengths to render itself a desirable filmmaking location-and the entertainment industry is taking notice.read full article.

    Places to Shoot a Movie in Michigan 

    March 30 2010

    When someone says Michigan, what comes to mind-besides cars, snow and college football? How about regional filmmaking capital?

    That idea may be new to some movie fans and movie makers, but it shouldnt be. After all, the Wolverine State has long attracted filmmakers as a shooting location, thanks to its excellent cities, historically strong economy, and-above all-its great geographical diversity.read full article.

    Getting a Handle on Grip - Understanding the Fundamentals of a Production Grip

    Check out this short video if you're interested in learning more about the fundamentals of a production grip.

    Join the Discussion Forum that connects Michigan's creative and production community!

    This list is intended to inspire, educate, show trends and help members of the motion picture and commercial television community throughout Detroit and Michigan network using a knowledge base. Visit Yahoo Group.

    The Big Valley: Susan Sarandon & Ryan Phillipe Star in Movie, Lee Majors to Appear 

    Published: March 29, 2010

    Now The Big Valley, the western series that launched the careers of Linda Evans and Lee Majors, is going to take a stab at a remake, with Susan Sarandon, Ryan Phillipe, Richard Drefuss, and Bruce Dern in key roles.

    Filming is expected to get underway in May with principal photography in Michigan and New Mexicoread full article